Imposter Syndrome

MIT professors are now particularly attuned to the issue of “impostor syndrome” — a feeling that students, or even professors, can have that they must be at MIT by mistake. Rick addresses this timeless doubt-inducing gremlin through a process of 'Simply Noticing, Accentuating the Obvious, and a process called the Art of Graceful Change, which he defines so clearly in his seminal work Taming Your Gremlin®.

In A Master Class in Gremlin Taming®, Rick addresses this further with Hypnotic Pre-Convictions. (see chapter 8). He has this and much more to say: from the time you are pushed out onto the planet, finding yourself smack dab in the middle of whatever unique drama you happened to slide out into, you have been bombarded with experiences. From those experiences you've formed all sorts of ideas about who you are, who you imagine you're supposed to be, and how the world works.

You have ideas about how loveable you are, how likeable you are, how smart you are, how creative you are, how your relationships will unfold, how successful you will be, and even how you stack up in relation to your peers. These Hypnotic Pre-Convictions are wrapped tightly around the natural you. It would behoove you to remember that any self-concept is false, simply because we are not a concept.

Rick then goes on to share how to experience the natural you, a place of clear feelings and pure potential.

Consider sharing Taming Your Gremlin® or A Master Class in Gremlin-Taming® with someone, you never know how much they might need the assist in freeing themselves from the monster of the mind.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

Taming Your Gremlin® and Gremlin-Taming® are internationally registered trademarks of Richard D. Carson.